The Spider ‘Makes The Bad Guys Wet Their Pants’

No, this isn't some alternate version of Spider-Man.  This ruthless badass pre-dates him by nearly 30 years.

Andy Hunsakerby Andy Hunsaker

The Spider #1

Dynamite Entertainment has made a business out of revitalizing classic characters like The Lone Ranger and The Shadow, and they're doing it again with the lesser-known but amazingly cool-looking character of The Spider, coming to comics in May thanks to Mystery Men and Black Panther writer David Liss and artist Colton Worley.

The Spider is not some alternate-reality version of Spider-Man.  In fact, Stan Lee credits The Spider, created nearly 30 years earlier than Peter Parker back in 1933 by Harry Steeger, with inspiring the name of Parker's alter ego.  For his part, The Spider was the crimefighting alter ego of millionaire playboy Richard Wentworth (yes, he predates Batman, too), and his origins are being updated for the 21st century.

Here's Dynamite's blurb about the plot to The Spider #1

In The Spider #1, the world knows Richard Wentworth as a decorated war hero and the son of a wealthy industrialist – but only a few confidants know the truth.  As New York City slides into violence and despair, Wentworth has transformed himself into a force of justice as The Spider!  With only his wits, his technology, and his pistols to aid him, he fights a one-man man war against crime, but when a mysterious new villain threatens the city with an unspeakable horror, it may be more than even The Spider can handle.  How far will a sane man go to restore order to an insane world? 

 

"Part of what always made The Spider so cool was the sheer scope of destruction caused by his villains," says Liss.  "The Spider's enemies thought nothing of demolishing city blocks, killing thousands, turning countless innocents into mindless slaves.  Faced with crime this insane, The Spider had turn himself into a force of equal ferocity, destruction and ruthlessness.  He's the most badass and take-no-prisoners of the pulp heroes because he has to be, and it's been absolutely awesome transferring that kind of sentiment from the 1930s to contemporary times. Some things have been updated, but he's still the kind of vigilante that makes the bad guys wet their pants."

 

Check out these alternate covers for The Spider #1, provided by John Cassaday, Alex Ross, Ron Lesser and former Black Panther artist Francesco Francavilla – not to mention a few pages of interior art from Worley.  This guy just looks amazingly badass.  You know you want to read this.

 

The Spider #1

 

The Spider #1

 

The Spider #1

 

The Spider #1

 

The Spider #1

 

The Spider #1

 

The Spider #1

 

The Spider #1